So, we moved to a new place, bye bye NW6 hello N8. Still inside the North Circular but it’s now easier for me to get there than to Zone 1.

Noted this morning the differences in the waves of city folk who drift across my path on my new commute (see above) with the waves of tourists that drifted across my path on my previous commute (hyde park, the roads parallel to the south bank). The former will aggressively stare you down as they step confidently and predictably into oncoming traffic the latter are good natured but unpredictable only realising they’re standing in the middle of the road at the last minute and then jumping in random directions.

Also, the above route used the EXACT same number of calories as a Starbucks chocolate muffin, clearly it was written in the stars that I should eat one.
So, we moved to a new place, bye bye NW6 hello N8. Still inside the North Circular but it’s now easier for me to get there than to Zone 1.

Noted this morning the differences in the waves of city folk who drift across my path on my new commute (see above) with the waves of tourists that drifted across my path on my previous commute (hyde park, the roads parallel to the south bank). The former will aggressively stare you down as they step confidently and predictably into oncoming traffic the latter are good natured but unpredictable only realising they’re standing in the middle of the road at the last minute and then jumping in random directions.

Also, the above route used the EXACT same number of calories as a Starbucks chocolate muffin, clearly it was written in the stars that I should eat one.

tomewing
Sapone illustrated the app’s usefulness by imagining the needs of Dan, a hard-working, hypothetical user whose time for tidying up and shopping is limited, and whose morning, mid-mess cereal lacks milk. “So Dan could have scheduled a Homejoy cleaning or booked Washio to get his laundry. He could have even called Instacart to go grab him milk, but all of that takes time and coordination and the mental energy—Dan doesn’t want to give it.”

POOR OLD DAN! This is from a write-up on PSFK of Alfred, a “sharing economy” app which works as a kind of Uber for servants. Its selling point, apparently, is to make life easier for rich tech kids who are such unbelievable babies they can’t even operate all the other sharing economy apps by themselves. Alfred is named after Bruce Wayne’s manservant - I would humbly suggest we’re well into Prince George and Blackadder territory here.

Alfred is being featured because it won a start-up competition - “judged by financial and tech royalty”. As the article leads off, “Silicon Valley has spoken”. Indeed.

(Number of words in the post spent on the terms, working conditions, salaries etc. of the “Alfreds” (are they allowed their own name too?) - zero.)

Nemo Heart of Ice &  Nemo The Roses Of Berlin — Alan Moore, Kevin O’Neill
A couple of League of Extraordinary Gentlemen spinoffs. I was hoping that these might be a retreat from the look-at-what-I’ve-read shtick which LOEG has totally collapsed under the weight of, that they’d not just be about referencing and reconciling disparate fictional elements, more straight down the line adventure comics in the style of league vols 1 & 2. Well, a bit, but not really. The stories are decent if a little slight and I always love Kevin O’Neill’s art work which here is fantastic, crammed with invention — there’s a particularly arresting reveal on one page in Heart of Ice where the protagonists get their first glimpse of the mountains of madness, I laughed out loud at how well he pulled it off; keeping me blind to the full page until I’d read all the smaller panels down the side by which point my gaze was at the base of the mountains and scanning back up they revealed themselves from the characters view point, base to summit. Ultimately though, in-spite of these flashes of formal brilliance, there’s a distinct feeling of Moore and O’Neill doing what they want and hey, if anyone else likes it that’s a bonus man — fair enough I suppose, they can pull it off.

Nemo Heart of Ice & Nemo The Roses Of Berlin — Alan Moore, Kevin O’Neill
A couple of League of Extraordinary Gentlemen spinoffs. I was hoping that these might be a retreat from the look-at-what-I’ve-read shtick which LOEG has totally collapsed under the weight of, that they’d not just be about referencing and reconciling disparate fictional elements, more straight down the line adventure comics in the style of league vols 1 & 2. Well, a bit, but not really. The stories are decent if a little slight and I always love Kevin O’Neill’s art work which here is fantastic, crammed with invention — there’s a particularly arresting reveal on one page in Heart of Ice where the protagonists get their first glimpse of the mountains of madness, I laughed out loud at how well he pulled it off; keeping me blind to the full page until I’d read all the smaller panels down the side by which point my gaze was at the base of the mountains and scanning back up they revealed themselves from the characters view point, base to summit. Ultimately though, in-spite of these flashes of formal brilliance, there’s a distinct feeling of Moore and O’Neill doing what they want and hey, if anyone else likes it that’s a bonus man — fair enough I suppose, they can pull it off.

fieryfalcon
The long-term project of those who decry the role of unearned advantage in human society should not be to try and parse who is most and least privileged. The project should be to deny the salience of “merit” as a moral arbiter of material security and comfort. The very notion of just deserts– the notion that some people have legitimate accomplishments that we must celebrate because they represent “merit,” whatever that is, distinct from their privileges– is what has to die. There is no space where privilege ends and legitimate accomplishment begins. There is, instead, a world of such multivariate complexity that we can never know whose accomplishments are earned and whose aren’t. Instead, we should recognize the folly of tying material security and comfort to our flawed perceptions of other people’s value, and instead institute an economic system based on the absolute right of all people to food, shelter, clothing, health care, and education.
Freddie DeBoer (via fieryfalcon)
Seems reasonable
philsandifer

cleofisrandolph asked:

So the first draft of Jerusalem has been completed, and it's over 1 million words long. How hype are you?

philsandifer answered:

That book terrifies me. I can’t wait.

1 million words! Put it another way, that’s about twice as long as Infinite Jest or War and Peace (neither of which I’ve read, both of which I intend to).

I’m an Alan Moore fan, I really liked Voice of the Fire — it was short enough for its problems to be easy to ignore. But really, I don’t think Moore is a great prose stylist nor one who’s particularly good at pacey page turner stuff outside the comics medium. If you’re going to keep someone on board for a million words you kind of have to be one or the other.

In summary: Assuming it finds a publisher I will probably buy this though I may not read it all.

Three — Gillen, Kelly, Bellaire, Cowles
Brutalised Hellot slaves rebel against and kill their Spartan tormentors before going on the run. An enjoyable boys own adventure (with more blood and guts than that might imply, also a bit of sex) this feels like a minor work in Gillen’s increasingly impressive oeuvre, a simple adventure story well told ( a couple of problems with the art notwithstanding ).
Also this is a response to 300 I’m not sure it’s totally effective as such. Gillen allows Frank Miller’s comic to set the battlefield i.e. it’s a full bore action comic where the best fighter wins. Throughout the book excitement is maintained by violence, these are Millers terms 100% and 1. Ryan’s super hero venacular can’t match Miller’s brutal, super-economic linework or his bold yet legible layouts; in terms of portraying action 300 is simply better. 2. I think sticking broadly to 300's genre template weakens Three’s position, the argument becomes primarily about historicity — and I don’t think anyone could argue that Gillen’s presentation is not more in tune with our current understanding of Spartan society — but Frank Miller has been pretty open in describing his work as propoganda so that’s kind of beside the point maybe? 300 which is in my view a genuinely fascist work needs a moral response — one that shows alternatives to violence (state and personal) not just that the underdogs can sometimes win at that game.
PS my copy of this is in storage at the moment and I read 300 in an afternoon in a library about 5 years ago so you know, my memory may not be great and this should all be taken with that in mind.
Three — Gillen, Kelly, Bellaire, Cowles

Brutalised Hellot slaves rebel against and kill their Spartan tormentors before going on the run. An enjoyable boys own adventure (with more blood and guts than that might imply, also a bit of sex) this feels like a minor work in Gillen’s increasingly impressive oeuvre, a simple adventure story well told ( a couple of problems with the art notwithstanding ).

Also this is a response to 300 I’m not sure it’s totally effective as such. Gillen allows Frank Miller’s comic to set the battlefield i.e. it’s a full bore action comic where the best fighter wins. Throughout the book excitement is maintained by violence, these are Millers terms 100% and 1. Ryan’s super hero venacular can’t match Miller’s brutal, super-economic linework or his bold yet legible layouts; in terms of portraying action 300 is simply better. 2. I think sticking broadly to 300's genre template weakens Three’s position, the argument becomes primarily about historicity — and I don’t think anyone could argue that Gillen’s presentation is not more in tune with our current understanding of Spartan society — but Frank Miller has been pretty open in describing his work as propoganda so that’s kind of beside the point maybe? 300 which is in my view a genuinely fascist work needs a moral response — one that shows alternatives to violence (state and personal) not just that the underdogs can sometimes win at that game.

PS my copy of this is in storage at the moment and I read 300 in an afternoon in a library about 5 years ago so you know, my memory may not be great and this should all be taken with that in mind.