PS, not sure if I believe the Macbeth story. I’ve read quite a lot of stuff about Tolkien and had never heard it before — though had noticed the resonance obv (entirely possible, perhaps likely that I’ve just forgotten). Apart from anything Éowyn is of woman born so it doesn’t quite work.

arachnofiend

arachnofiend:

marapetsrules:

bobfoxsky:

“You fool. No man can kill me.”

How many times am I allowed to reblog this before it gets weird?

image

Fun facts: Tolkien constructed this scene because he came out of Macbeth thinking that Shakespeare had missed a golden opportunity with the ”Be bloody, bold, and resolute; laugh to scorn the power of man, for none of woman born shall harm Macbeth” prophecy

one of my fave bits of the book and of the films. I love the rubbery physicality of the Nazgul’s judder — always reminds me of Jackson’s splatty horror roots.

84 Charing Cross Road & The Duchess of Bloomsbury — Helene Hanff
Ran out of books on holiday so borrowed this form my cousin in Cornwall. The first of the two books is composed of the letters written between an American TV writer and an English bookseller and records their developing friendship. It’s nice and has some interesting incidental details about post war London. Slight but short, doesn’t outstay its welcome.
The second book is said writer’s diary of her time visiting London in the 70s (after the death of the bookseller from the first bit) again there’s some interesting incidental detail and the book is quite short, though not short enough in my opinion.
84 Charing Cross Road & The Duchess of Bloomsbury — Helene Hanff

Ran out of books on holiday so borrowed this form my cousin in Cornwall. The first of the two books is composed of the letters written between an American TV writer and an English bookseller and records their developing friendship. It’s nice and has some interesting incidental details about post war London. Slight but short, doesn’t outstay its welcome.

The second book is said writer’s diary of her time visiting London in the 70s (after the death of the bookseller from the first bit) again there’s some interesting incidental detail and the book is quite short, though not short enough in my opinion.

Making Comics — Scott McCloud
This was a bit patchy. I mean I have no real interest in making comics so I’m not the target here but I do enjoy how-to guides generally, e.g. Brenda Braithwaites ‘Challenges for Game Designers’ is really interesting — the way it decomposes video games (and other types of games) and provides a clear vocabulary for talking and reasoning about them and how it suggests what trade offs might be involved in certain design decisions, it’s good. Making Comics has all that stuff but apart form a couple of exceptions the comic format isn’t as well used as it was in McClouds classic understanding comics and as result the whole thing feels a bit slight — the best bits are the perhaps the couple of pages of text that comprise the notes at the end of each chapter where McCloud is able to explore some ideas more fully e.g. the discussion of the merits of traditional all caps lettering vs standard mixed case lettering is really interesting but short of sticking in a whole page of each the arguments put forward can’t necessarily be advanced any better by having McClouds avatar say them. The best visual bit is the exploration of expressions (pretty much the reason I picked up this book)
I do like the fact that McCloud tends to treat equally the images and the words though. My feeling is that a lot of comics criticism focusses on the words (critics are often words people after all and theres a whole tradition of taking about how people have used words to tell stories and of interrogating that kind of storytelling) and whilst the fan culture (on tumblr etc.) often trades in the images they tend to be pulled out of context in a way that favours flash layouts or highly polished renders at the expense of the kind of bread and butter story telling chops that IMO is what makes for really great comics art. So anyway, some comics reviews coming up so maybe I’ll try to talk mainly about he pictures…

Making Comics — Scott McCloud
This was a bit patchy. I mean I have no real interest in making comics so I’m not the target here but I do enjoy how-to guides generally, e.g. Brenda Braithwaites ‘Challenges for Game Designers’ is really interesting — the way it decomposes video games (and other types of games) and provides a clear vocabulary for talking and reasoning about them and how it suggests what trade offs might be involved in certain design decisions, it’s good. Making Comics has all that stuff but apart form a couple of exceptions the comic format isn’t as well used as it was in McClouds classic understanding comics and as result the whole thing feels a bit slight — the best bits are the perhaps the couple of pages of text that comprise the notes at the end of each chapter where McCloud is able to explore some ideas more fully e.g. the discussion of the merits of traditional all caps lettering vs standard mixed case lettering is really interesting but short of sticking in a whole page of each the arguments put forward can’t necessarily be advanced any better by having McClouds avatar say them. The best visual bit is the exploration of expressions (pretty much the reason I picked up this book)

I do like the fact that McCloud tends to treat equally the images and the words though. My feeling is that a lot of comics criticism focusses on the words (critics are often words people after all and theres a whole tradition of taking about how people have used words to tell stories and of interrogating that kind of storytelling) and whilst the fan culture (on tumblr etc.) often trades in the images they tend to be pulled out of context in a way that favours flash layouts or highly polished renders at the expense of the kind of bread and butter story telling chops that IMO is what makes for really great comics art. So anyway, some comics reviews coming up so maybe I’ll try to talk mainly about he pictures…